Wishing everyone here and around the globe peace and happiness this holiday season!

Enjoy 20% off in our holiday sale until December 28th.




Tru is now online!


Hellooooo my friends!  It’s been awhile I know …I haven’t blogged in quite some time but that is all about to change and I have lots of things I want to write about.  I have been working hard to bring our collection to you right in the comfort of your own homes!  I am sooooo thrilled to announce the launch of our online store 🙂  Please check it out at www.truvogue.com when you get a moment.  We ship throughout North America and if anyone would like to purchase any items internationally please email info@truvogue.com and we will work something out.  Also, if you subscribe you will receive 10% off your first purchase!

This first collection is called ‘Essentials’ because it focuses on buildable staple pieces that every wardrobe needs. The fabric is super comfortable and breathable made out of the softest, eco-friendly modal fabric that feels like butter against the skin.   All the pieces from this collection were made ethically right here in Toronto, Canada!!  So shop local, shop ethical and care for the planet at the same time 🙂

Take the ‘Wear no evil’ Pledge!

A friend recently sent this to me and while I have literally been doing this over the past 8 months or so I am now publicly taking this pledge to share with all of you.  Follow this link to sign up and share your pledge on your facebook page so we can all join together in this mission to support brands that are really trying to make a difference in the world.  Let’s vote with our dollars.  Pledge no evil!

Please share any great finds of places to shop that uphold these standards in the comments section below 🙂

How do you define Sustainable and Ethical Fashion??


There are a lot of words being thrown around these days such as: ethical fashion, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion.  But what does it all mean?  It means different things to different people however I think Livia Firth nailed it in her article below when she broaches this subject.
Continue reading How do you define Sustainable and Ethical Fashion??

More Green Carpet Challenge luxury!!!

This is a drool worthy post. I absolutely adore Livia Firth and what she has done to bring awareness to the luxury fashion industry in regards to the environment and labour standards.  She started a consultancy company called eco-age which works with brands to build sustainability into their supply chain. Part of that is the Green Carpet Challenge in which she partners with luxury power houses to go above and beyond in the creation of a collection that meets her high standards. I have already posted about the gorgeous Gucci bags made of anti-deforestation leather in the Brazilian Amazon, now here are two more luxury designers that have partnered with the Green Carpet Challenge to create stunning pieces that shows the world that not only is sustainability possible it is crucial to the future of our planet and people.

Since high street stores like Zara and H&M get inspiration from luxury runways, my hope is that if luxury fashion puts sustainability at the forefront of their designs than the high street too will have to follow suit.

First up, as if there wasn’t enough to love about Sergio Rossi! He is embracing sustainability and debuted a capsule collection on Sept 3rd. These GORGEOUS stiletto shoes and bags are made out of the first EVER locally sourced organic silk from a family run mill in Italy and lead free swarovski crystals. Take a look:

also in black!

these are my favourite!…

Other notable sustainable features of these stunning shoes is the use of chrome-free leather finishing from Europe and nickel-free metals.

We move on to the stunning display of British-Turkish designer, Erdem Moralioglu, sustainable collection that launched during London’s Fashion Week this past September at The Wallace Collection.  The GCC has strict criteria in which the designers have to comply with which means the 12 designs were made from reused, surplus, or sustainably certified materials.  However, that didn’t ruffle his feathers as the designs are all very much in tune with Erdem’s feminine, luxury aesthetic.

As quoted in the Telegraph, “I was inspired by the Wallace Collection,” revealed the designer; “I loved the idea of creating a collection that had a really human hand to it.”

You can see in the pics below that each dress was displayed as a work of art..a canvas to be admired.

The Erdem Green Carpet Collection in partnership with Mercedes-Benz at ...

Organic Cotton vs Conventional Cotton…what’s the diff?

Ah Cotton…the beautiful, soft substance that we use in our everyday lives. From our sheets, to our towels, to the clothes we wear day in and day out, its something we just cannot live without.  As attractive as it is, what lurks behind in the shadows of cotton production is a not so beautiful picture.

Conventional Cotton

Cotton is highly attractive to insects (eg cutworm, army worm, loopers, aphids, whitefly, spider mite and more).  Because this effects crops, cotton has become heavily reliant on pesticides…so heavily reliant that it uses 1/4 of the worlds pesticides and are the most pesticide dependent crops in the world.  These chemicals get into the soil and water and in turn destroy the environment and also effect the wildlife that come into contact with it.  In addition, farmers health are at risk of pesticide poisoning and serious other health issues.


Here are some facts displayed on the effect of pesticides on human health from the site organicconsumers:

  • In California, five of the top nine pesticides used on cotton are cancer-causing chemicals (cyanazine, dicofol, naled, propargite and trifluralin).
  • In Egypt, more than 50% of cotton workers in the 1990s suffered symptoms of chronic pesticide poisoning, including neurological and vision disorders.
  • In India, 91% of male cotton workers exposed to pesticides eight hours or more per day experienced some type of health disorder, including chromosomal aberrations, cell death and cell cycle delay.
  • In the US, a 1987 National Cancer Institute Study found a nearly seven-fold higher risk of leukemia for children whose parents used pesticides in their homes or gardens. The World Health Organization estimates that at least three million people are poisoned by pesticides every year and 20-40,000 more are killed.
  • Over 1 million Americans will learn they have some form of cancer and 10,400 people in the U.S. die each year from cancer related to pesticides.

So as  you can see conventional cotton has a number of unsustainable factors that need to be addressed.

Organic Cotton

In the U.S., one-third of a pound of chemicals is needed just to grow enough conventional cotton for a regular T-shirt. “Organic cotton is a solution to the problem of chemical use in conventional cotton,” says Lynda Grose of the Sustainable Cotton Project. Grose adds, “The ecological goal is to convert fields from chemical controls to biological controls.”

There is a lot of skepticism around organic cotton because textiles don’t have to be certified in order to be called organic. However there are a few certifications to look out for when purchasing organic cotton to ensure its organic from field to finished product such as GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard), Soil Association, and Organic Exchange.  Check out the website cottonedon for more detailed information on these certfications.

And we all know about the sweatshops and unfair working conditions of the labourers.  These organic certifications have social responsibility and living wages built into their core philosophy and monitoring so it’s not just about the cotton but the people behind the farming and the manufacturing. At least now we have information available to us to make our own informed decisions.

Granted organic cotton is more expensive but we have been brainwashed into thinking that fast and cheap fashion is normal and $5 -$10 for a cotton t-shirt is the going rate, but someone or something else is always paying the price. Organic cotton is about respect for people and planet and is more expensive to produce as it’s much more labour intensive. Cottonedon says “The price of organic includes investments made by farmers who are protecting the environment, maintaining soil fertility, preserving biodiversity and conserving water.”

Below is a chart that lists the major differences between organic cotton and conventional cotton from seed throughout the whole process.



http://www.greencotton.wordpress.com – Sources used for this table include: National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service, Organic Exchange, Organic Trade Association (OTA), and Harmony Art Organic Designs.